Becoming a Yoga Teacher in Your Semi-Retirement

Becoming a semi-retired Yoga instructor is much more appealing in today’s job market. All of us reach a point where we want to spend our time making a contribution to our families and communities. The option of part-time work, as a Yoga teacher, is one of many for a new breed of retirees.

Due to laws like The Age Discrimination in Employment Act, forced retirement is not the issue it once was; but some employees, who reach 65 years of age, are quietly encouraged to leave. With an assortment of options, such as: IRAs, 401k investments, part-time work, or Social Security, the option to remain active in the workforce on a part-time basis is a reality.

If you are 50 years or older, you may be contemplating what to do after full-time work. It’s not like we want to completely leave the workforce, but it would be nice to have part of the day or week to call your own. Teaching Yoga, as an independent contractor, is a viable option for part-time self-employment.

Many people have spent their younger adult lives working overtime or working two jobs to support their families. At a certain point in life, we realize the need to enjoy life before it’s too late. Living the Yoga lifestyle is a great way to extend the quality of life and pass the gift of health on to others.

Matured Yoga teachers tend to be aware of the importance of student safety because experience teaches us to recognize the potential for injuries in daily situations. There is also a huge market for teaching Yoga to the 77 million baby boomers who want to safely practice Yoga for longevity.

© Copyright 2008 – Paul Jerard / Aura Publications

Adults With Autism – Coping With Autism As an Adult in Today’s World

Adults with autism have many options open to them depending on how they function. Many high functioning autistic adults or those who have Asperger’s syndrome are able to function well when mainstreamed into society. They can hold jobs, live on their own and even have peer friendships. This does not mean it all runs smoothly and easily for them, just that they are able to do it. They will still have communication and social difficulties. They will still very much need the back up of family and their health care providers.

Even those who have their own apartments will still need some back up to help with some of the things they cannot do themselves. They may be able to hold a job, but not pay bills. They may be able to cook meals for themselves but not do a food shopping on their own. They may require help accessing those government services that they are entitled to as a disabled adult. Family members usually do this, but there are people from various government services that may take on these tasks if here are no family members who can help.

There is the option for the autistic adult to continue to live at home with their parents. This will be a good alternative to someone is able to have some independence but still is more comfortable in the structured life of living at home. Everything is familiar, the structure and routines continue uninterrupted and the parents are always there to keep things running smoothly. But, this only works until the parents become old or ill themselves. If this is the option chosen some alternatives must be set-up for the eventually of the death of the parents.

What of those adults with autism who are not as high functioning but still strive to have some independence? What can they do? If living independently is not possible there are group homes. These homes will provide basic care while continuing to teach the autistic adult some independence. They will teach meal preparation, how to do the laundry, how to keep their rooms tidy and take care of their own personal hygiene issues. The autistic adult can have a separate living space, his or her own bedroom, but share the rest of a house. They may even find work in a sheltered workshop.

Sometimes there are no even semi-independent alternatives based on an adult who is low functioning, with parents who are aging and unable to continue caring for them. Their abilities do not allow placement in a group home and so the only option left is an institution. This is usually the alternative of last resort.

Adult Lifestyle Community – A Definition

Now that our aging population has visibly become a force to be reckoned with, many homebuilders are discovering mature adults to be a potent market. But often homebuilders tend to miss the market by focusing more on the home (which is after all what builders are selling), rather than the lifestyle (which is what drives most of the sales activity in an adult lifestyle community).

Many developers and homebuilders operate from the misconception that mature buyers prefer to live in homes that are inexpensive and focus on pricing their homes as low as possible, believing that product and price are what drives the sale. And surely there are adult lifestyle purchasers for whom price is a prime consideration. But most potential residents of an adult lifestyle community are looking for three things: adult, lifestyle and community.

Purchasers in adult communities want to be sure that the community they are considering moving to is indeed an “adult” community. As such, many such communities are age-restricted, with a hard and fast set of rules that precludes the possibility of children moving in. Of course, in jurisdictions that do not allow discrimination on the basis of age, there are other ways to “restrict” who moves in. This could range from so-called restrictive covenants registered on title of the property to rules about the permanent number of residents that may occupy any one dwelling unit (usually no more than two) under a condominium corporation or a rental agreement. Finally, the best method to maintain the integrity of an adult lifestyle community is to offer homes that are specifically designed for an older, childless demographic. The market will take care of the rest.

Some builder want to hedge their bets by offering large two storey homes in adult communities, imagining that they would be appealing to younger baby boomers that still have children at home. This fallacy results in pleasing neither the younger baby boomers that do not want to live in a community comprised largely of older people, nor the active adults seeking a childfree lifestyle.

As stated above, one of the most important considerations on the part of the purchaser in an adult community involves lifestyle. Many people in their 50s and 60s who are either retired or semi-retired have a lot of leisure time and a plethora of interests about which they are very passionate. Many are into golf in a big way and seek communities that are near golf courses. Many are into personal fitness and look for communities that provide exercise facilities. There are nearly as many interests as there are individuals seeking to live the adult lifestyle. Those communities that recognize this very important fact tend to do very well, while those that don’t, not so much.

Finally, active adults tend to be very social and seek to live in a community where they find others of similar interests and values. Many of these communities have organized activities, such as a bridge club, a golf group, round-robin tennis tournaments or group projects such as quilting or knitting. A sense of being a part of a community of like-minded individuals really is one of the most important aspects of a successful adult lifestyle community. These are the reasons why a community clubhouse is probably one of the most important amenities that any adult lifestyle community could provide. And the greater the variety of amenities and interests, the more people will be attracted to live there.